Week 12: March

Week 12: March 19 thru 25th

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3/19 of… 1836

Battle of Coleto Creek, TX. Troops under the command of Col. James Fannin surrender after a desperate battle with Mexican Cavalry.  {001}
see:
Wk. 13, 03/27/1836 – Goliad Massacre

1839

Rachael Plummer, age 20, died in Houston, TX. Her health destroyed and her once red hair turned grey, she lived barely a year after her release from a two year captivity by the Comanche.  {001}
see:
Wk. 20, 05/20/1836 – Fort Parker Massacre
Wk. 25, 06/19/1837 – Rachael Plummer

1840

San Antonio, TX — The Council House Fight. Comanche leaders come to parley under a white flag. They return one hostage, but the young girl,  Matilda Lockhart, has been mutilated (her nose burned off). The whites then attempt to arrest and hold the Indian delegation, seeking the return of white prisoners held by Indian bands not represented at the conference. The situation deteriorates into a massacre. A dozen chiefs are killed at the council house, along with 35 warriors and several women and children — killed in the city streets and across the river. The Indians feel that a truce has been betrayed; the bad blood and killing will go on for years.   {001}

1848

Wyatt Berry Stapp Earp+5 born in Monmouth, IL. Pimp, gambler, gunfighter, lawman.  {001}

1850

Henry Wells and William Fargo*  found the American Express Company with Wells as president (1850-68), and Fargo and John Butterfield on the board. This is a consolidation of several ventures: Livingston, Fargo & Company; Wells, Butterfield & Company; and Wells & Company—A gathering of the coming giants in western transportation before the railroads.  {001}
see also:
*Wk 11, 10/18/1850 – photos
PLAYERS – Timelines Index – Timelines M – Z Index – Wells Fargo Timeline

1854

OWDR Republican Elephant Nast 1874 WebThe name Republican was first applied to a burgeoning movement made up of anti-slavery former Whigs, immigrants, and abolitionists in a small schoolhouse in Ripon, Wisconsin. Anti-Nebraska gatherings were called to voice opposition to Steven DouglasKansas/Nebraska Act* which wiped out the earlier Missouri Compromise of 1850.** Where the compromise assured the containment of slavery in the south and made the western territories free states (except Missouri) the new act would allow the settlers to choose their own path by a vote. Recent migrants were to be denied suffrage. Wisconsin was teeming with recent immigrants concerned for their rights. Most northern Whigs were pro-industry, pro-education, pro-modernization, and ambivalent about slavery, but when they seized on the popularity of the slavery issue they outgrew the old party, and the Republican Party was conceived.  Cartoon U.S. PD 1874 Thomas Nast, the first time for the elephant!  {003 & 001}
see:
*Wk. 22, 05/30/1854 – Kansas-Nebraska Act
**Wk. 36, 09/04/1850 – Compromise of 1850

1864

Charles M. Russell born in St. Louis, MO. Major western artist.  {001}Old West Daily Reader Subscribe Today

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