Week 31: July/August

Week 31: July 30th thru August 5th

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Names in bold will be found in Players; bolded Titles in References.

7/30 of… 1844

Marie LaFitte born in France, she will become a Madame in Fort Collins, CO.  {003}

1865

1877

Day five of the “Thirsting Time“: Capt. Nolan and thirteen men reach Double Lakes. Help will arrive the next day. Eventually the dead will all be accounted for: twenty-five horses, four mules, four soldiers and one buffalo hunter. Most survivors had been without water in the barren desert for more than eighty hours. This incredible story — of courage, deceit, and survival — replete with dissent and desertion in the ranks… and the Eastern papers in a tizzy over the whole event. The “Staked Plains Horror” is almost over.  {001}

1884

James Miller+2 takes his first victim, brother-in-law John Coop. Coop was shot in the head while sleeping on his porch after a disagreement with the teenage Miller, whose life sentence was voided by a technicality. Plum Creek, TX.  {001}

1885

Leaving Crescent City, CA on the second leg of a journey to Portland, OR, and after futilely steaming north for hours in a heavy gale, the S.S. Brother Jonathan attempted to return to the port to escape the tempest. She struck an uncharted rock near Point St. George and sank. Only nineteen of the 244 passengers and crew aboard survived. Among the victims were Brigadier General George Wright, Union Commander of the Department of the Pacific. Surveyor General of the Washington Territory and Abraham Lincoln’s physician and closest friend, Dr. Anson G. Henry. James Nisbet, a well-known publisher, who wrote a love note and his will while awaiting his death and Roseanna Keenan, a colorful San Francisco madam, who was traveling with seven “soiled doves”. As a result of this tragedy, new laws were written to increase passenger-ship safety, including the ability of lifeboats to be released from a sinking ship.
Not found until modern times, among other other things, her cargo consisted of hundreds of thousands of dollars in $10 and $20 gold coins, some private money and some said to have been gold intended to buy off territorial claims of a number of Native American tribes in the Oregon country. Illustration: U.S. PD pre-1923.  {001}
see:
The Originals Index – Lost treasures in the Old WestS. S. Brother Jonathon
References – DictionaryBrother Jonathon

Bat Masterson orders a pair of .45 cal. single action revolvers from Colt on the stationery of Cary and Wright’s Opera House Saloon: “…the barrel length should be the same length that the ejacting [sic] rod is, its finish should be nickel, and the grips, gutta percha.”  {001}

1895

The Rufus Buck Gang+3 kills U.S. Deputy Marshal John Garrett, OK, Indian Territory  {001}
see:
The Originals Index – Outlaw Gangs Index – Rufus Buck Gang

1971

Midnight: the closing of the Chicago Union Stockyards after a run of 106 years.  {001}
see:
Photo Gallery Index – Cow? What Cow?
Where did all the little dogies git along to?

7/31 of… 1860

Denver, CO. A group of rowdies from the Criterion move to take action against Rocky Mountain News editor W.N. Byers for his editorial against gambler Charley Harrison.* Assaulting Byers at his office, the group coerces him to accompany them back to the Criterion — where he is rescued by Harrison, armed and sent back to his workplace. Byers and others barricade themselves in, and soon George Steele rides by on a horse and fires Old West Daily Reader Subscribe Today

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